Photoset

prostheticknowledge:

Armadillo-T

A compact electric car than can fold in half when parked - video embedded below:

The small and light electric car completely folds in half when parking, making it a perfect fit for public or private transportation in an urban environment.

Looking for a parking space for hours at a busy shopping mall or being stuck on roads jammed with cars releasing large amounts of carbon dioxide are all-too-familiar scenes for city dwellers.

A group of researchers at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) recently developed a possible solution to such problems: a foldable, compact electric vehicle that can be utilized either as a personal car or part of the public transit system to connect major transportation routes within a city.

In-Soo Suh, associate professor of the Graduate School for Green Transportation at KAIST, and his research team introduced a prototype micro electric car called “Armadillo-T,” whose design is based on a native animal of South America, the armadillo, a placental mammal with a leathery armor shell.

The research team imitated the animal’s distinctive protection characteristic of rolling up into a ball when facing with threat from predators. Just as armadillos hide themselves inside the shell, Armadillo-T tucks its rear body away, shrinking its original size of 2.8 meters (110 inches) down to almost half, 1.65 meters (65 inches), when folding.

More at KAIST here

(via lauramashburn43)

Photo
Video
Photo

(Source: pinterest.com)

Photo
Photo
Tags: Calgary
Photo

(Source: plus.google.com)

Photoset

prostheticknowledge:

Algorave

Electronic music events without vinyl or mp3s - the music is generated with live coding:

Algorave is made from “sounds wholly or predominantly characterised by the emission of a succession of repetitive conditionals“. These days just about all electronic music is made using software, but with artificial barriers between the people creating the software algorithms and the people making the music. Using systems built for creating algorithmic music, such as IXI Lang, overtone, puredata, Max/MSP, SuperCollider, Impromptu or Fluxus, these barriers are broken down, and musicians are able to compose and work live with their music as algorithms. This has good and bad sides, but a different approach leads to interesting places.

This is no new idea, but Algoraves focus on humans making and dancing to music. Algorave musicians don’t pretend their software is being creative, they take responsibility for the music they make, shaping it using whatever means they have. More importantly the focus is not on what the musician is doing, but on the music, and people dancing to it. Algoraves embrace the alien sounds of raves from the past, and introduce alien, futuristic rhythms and beats made through strange, algorithm-aided processes. It’s up to the good people on the dancefloor to help the musicians make sense of this and do the real creative work in making a great party.

An example of an Algorave in action:

You can find out more about organized Algorave events here

(via johnkstamos)

Photo
fuckinrecordreviews:

DISASTER #5 Winter 1988

fuckinrecordreviews:

DISASTER #5 Winter 1988

(via thelittlerugshop)

Photo
philnoto:

Defender

philnoto:

Defender

(via marcjoh)